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Urethral Sphincter Prosthesis Suppliers @ …

N2 - Introduction Frequently encountered morbidities after prostatectomy include stress urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Patients with severe disease may undergo placement of both a penile prosthesis (PP) and an artificial urethral sphincter (AUS). Aim We hypothesized that concomitant PP may promote AUS cuff erosion by impaired corporal blood flow and/or direct pressure on the cuff. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of AUS cuff erosion in patients with and without a PP. Methods We reviewed 366 AUS operations at our tertiary center between 2007 and 2015 with a mean follow-up of 41 months (range 6–104). Included in the analysis were first-time AUS cuff erosions. Patients with recurrent erosions, AUS revisions, and iatrogenic erosions were excluded. In a separate analysis, we analyzed AUS explantations for all causes. Cohorts were compared by demographic information, preoperative characteristics, and rates of erosion and explantation. Main Outcome Measures Erosion confirmed by cystourethroscopy and explantation of the AUS for all causes. Results Among 366 AUS surgeries at a mean follow-up of 41 months, there were 248 (67.8%) AUS alone cases compared to 118 (32.2%) AUS and PP cases (AUS/PP). Sixty-two patients met exclusion criteria for first-time cuff erosion. Among 304 evaluable AUS patients, we found a significantly higher rate of erosion in the AUS/PP group (11/95, 11.6%) compared to the AUS alone group (9/209, 4.3%, P =.037). When examining explantations for all causes in the entire cohort (n = 366), we observed a significantly higher rate of device removal, (20/118, 17%) in the AUS/PP group compared to the AUS group (23/248, 9.2%, P =.044). Conclusion AUS/PP patients appear to have a higher risk of AUS cuff erosion and explantation compared to men with AUS alone.

Comprehensive suppliers list with E-mail/RFQ form for Urethral Sphincter Prosthesis

Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach.

Urinary Incontinence « Atlanta Center for Urinary Control

Introduction Frequently encountered morbidities after prostatectomy include stress urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Patients with severe disease may undergo placement of both a penile prosthesis (PP) and an artificial urethral sphincter (AUS). Aim We hypothesized that concomitant PP may promote AUS cuff erosion by impaired corporal blood flow and/or direct pressure on the cuff. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of AUS cuff erosion in patients with and without a PP. Methods We reviewed 366 AUS operations at our tertiary center between 2007 and 2015 with a mean follow-up of 41 months (range 6–104). Included in the analysis were first-time AUS cuff erosions. Patients with recurrent erosions, AUS revisions, and iatrogenic erosions were excluded. In a separate analysis, we analyzed AUS explantations for all causes. Cohorts were compared by demographic information, preoperative characteristics, and rates of erosion and explantation. Main Outcome Measures Erosion confirmed by cystourethroscopy and explantation of the AUS for all causes. Results Among 366 AUS surgeries at a mean follow-up of 41 months, there were 248 (67.8%) AUS alone cases compared to 118 (32.2%) AUS and PP cases (AUS/PP). Sixty-two patients met exclusion criteria for first-time cuff erosion. Among 304 evaluable AUS patients, we found a significantly higher rate of erosion in the AUS/PP group (11/95, 11.6%) compared to the AUS alone group (9/209, 4.3%, P =.037). When examining explantations for all causes in the entire cohort (n = 366), we observed a significantly higher rate of device removal, (20/118, 17%) in the AUS/PP group compared to the AUS group (23/248, 9.2%, P =.044). Conclusion AUS/PP patients appear to have a higher risk of AUS cuff erosion and explantation compared to men with AUS alone.

AB - A completely implantable prosthetic urethral sphincter was implanted in five patients with urinary incontinence. The preliminary results indicate that this prosthesis successfully restored continence to all five patients. These patients included a forty five-year-old woman who had persistent stress incontinence in spite of standard operative procedures, a thirty-six-year-old woman with neurologic bladder secondary to meningomyelocele, a thirteen-year-old girl with traumatic seventh-vertebra paraplegia and neurologic bladder, an eighteen-year-old man whose neurologic defect from myelomeningocele caused total urinary incontinence, and a twenty-four-year-old woman with cauda equina injury resulting in neurologic bladder dysfunction.

Urinary incontinence is the loss of bladder control

N2 - Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach.

N2 - A completely implantable prosthetic urethral sphincter was implanted in five patients with urinary incontinence. The preliminary results indicate that this prosthesis successfully restored continence to all five patients. These patients included a forty five-year-old woman who had persistent stress incontinence in spite of standard operative procedures, a thirty-six-year-old woman with neurologic bladder secondary to meningomyelocele, a thirteen-year-old girl with traumatic seventh-vertebra paraplegia and neurologic bladder, an eighteen-year-old man whose neurologic defect from myelomeningocele caused total urinary incontinence, and a twenty-four-year-old woman with cauda equina injury resulting in neurologic bladder dysfunction.

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Frederick Urology Specialists - Monocacy Health Partners

A completely implantable prosthetic urethral sphincter was implanted in five patients with urinary incontinence. The preliminary results indicate that this prosthesis successfully restored continence to all five patients. These patients included a forty five-year-old woman who had persistent stress incontinence in spite of standard operative procedures, a thirty-six-year-old woman with neurologic bladder secondary to meningomyelocele, a thirteen-year-old girl with traumatic seventh-vertebra paraplegia and neurologic bladder, an eighteen-year-old man whose neurologic defect from myelomeningocele caused total urinary incontinence, and a twenty-four-year-old woman with cauda equina injury resulting in neurologic bladder dysfunction.

Bladder Health And Reconstructive Urology Institute | …

AB - Erectile dysfunction (ED) and stress urinary incontinence (SUI) from urethral sphincteric deficiency is not an uncommon problem. The commonest etiology is intervention for localized prostate cancer and/or radical cystoprostatectomy for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Despite advances in surgical technology with robotic assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy and nerve sparing techniques, the rates of ED and SUI remain relatively unchanged. They both impact greatly on quality of life domains and have been associated with poor performance outcomes. Both the artificial urinary sphincter and penile prosthesis are gold standard treatments with proven efficacy, satisfaction and durability for end-stage SUI and ED respectively. Simultaneous prosthesis implantation for concurrent conditions has been well described, mostly in small retrospective series. The uptake of combination surgery has been slow due in part to technical demands of the surgery and to an extent, a heightened anxiety over potential complications. This paper aims to discuss the technical aspect of concurrent surgery for both disease entity and the current published outcomes of the various surgical techniques with this approach.

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AB - Introduction Frequently encountered morbidities after prostatectomy include stress urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction. Patients with severe disease may undergo placement of both a penile prosthesis (PP) and an artificial urethral sphincter (AUS). Aim We hypothesized that concomitant PP may promote AUS cuff erosion by impaired corporal blood flow and/or direct pressure on the cuff. The aim of this study was to compare the rate of AUS cuff erosion in patients with and without a PP. Methods We reviewed 366 AUS operations at our tertiary center between 2007 and 2015 with a mean follow-up of 41 months (range 6–104). Included in the analysis were first-time AUS cuff erosions. Patients with recurrent erosions, AUS revisions, and iatrogenic erosions were excluded. In a separate analysis, we analyzed AUS explantations for all causes. Cohorts were compared by demographic information, preoperative characteristics, and rates of erosion and explantation. Main Outcome Measures Erosion confirmed by cystourethroscopy and explantation of the AUS for all causes. Results Among 366 AUS surgeries at a mean follow-up of 41 months, there were 248 (67.8%) AUS alone cases compared to 118 (32.2%) AUS and PP cases (AUS/PP). Sixty-two patients met exclusion criteria for first-time cuff erosion. Among 304 evaluable AUS patients, we found a significantly higher rate of erosion in the AUS/PP group (11/95, 11.6%) compared to the AUS alone group (9/209, 4.3%, P =.037). When examining explantations for all causes in the entire cohort (n = 366), we observed a significantly higher rate of device removal, (20/118, 17%) in the AUS/PP group compared to the AUS group (23/248, 9.2%, P =.044). Conclusion AUS/PP patients appear to have a higher risk of AUS cuff erosion and explantation compared to men with AUS alone.

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