Call us toll-free

Quick academic help

Don't let the stress of school get you down! Have your essay written by a professional writer before the deadline arrives.

Calculate the price

Pages:

275 Words

$19,50

Different categories of biodiversity explain productivity ..

Aim While physical constraints influence terrestrial primary productivity, the extent to which geographical variation in productivity is influenced by physiological adaptations and changes in vegetation structure is unclear. Further, quantifying the effect of variability in species traits on ecosystems remains a critical research challenge. Here, we take a macroecological approach and ask if variation in the stoichiometric traits (C: N: P ratios) of plants and primary productivity across global-scale temperature gradients is consistent with a scaling model that integrates recent insights from the theories of metabolic scaling and ecological stoichiometry. Location This study is global in scope, encompassing a wide variety of terrestrial plant communities. Methods We first develop a scaling model that incorporates potentially adaptive variation in leaf and whole-plant nutrient content, kinetic aspects of photosynthesis and plant respiration, and the allometry of biomass partitioning and allocation. We then examine extensive data sets concerning the stoichiometry and productivity of diverse plant communities in light of the model. Results Across diverse ecosystems, both foliar stoichiometry (N:P) and 'nitrogen productivity' (which depends on both community size structure and plant nutrient content) vary systematically across global scale temperature gradients. Primary productivity shows no relationship to temperature. Main conclusions The model predicts that the observed patterns of variation in plant stoichiometry and nutrient productivity may offset the temperature dependence of primary production expected from the kinetics of photosynthesis alone. Our approach provides a quantitative framework for treating potentially adaptive functional variation across communities as a continuum and may thus inform studies of global change. More generally, our approach represents one of the first explicit combinations of ecological stoichiometry and metabolic scaling theories in the analysis of macroecological patterns.

Productivity gradient affects the temporal dynamics of testate amoebae in a neotropical floodplain

N2 - Aim While physical constraints influence terrestrial primary productivity, the extent to which geographical variation in productivity is influenced by physiological adaptations and changes in vegetation structure is unclear. Further, quantifying the effect of variability in species traits on ecosystems remains a critical research challenge. Here, we take a macroecological approach and ask if variation in the stoichiometric traits (C: N: P ratios) of plants and primary productivity across global-scale temperature gradients is consistent with a scaling model that integrates recent insights from the theories of metabolic scaling and ecological stoichiometry. Location This study is global in scope, encompassing a wide variety of terrestrial plant communities. Methods We first develop a scaling model that incorporates potentially adaptive variation in leaf and whole-plant nutrient content, kinetic aspects of photosynthesis and plant respiration, and the allometry of biomass partitioning and allocation. We then examine extensive data sets concerning the stoichiometry and productivity of diverse plant communities in light of the model. Results Across diverse ecosystems, both foliar stoichiometry (N:P) and 'nitrogen productivity' (which depends on both community size structure and plant nutrient content) vary systematically across global scale temperature gradients. Primary productivity shows no relationship to temperature. Main conclusions The model predicts that the observed patterns of variation in plant stoichiometry and nutrient productivity may offset the temperature dependence of primary production expected from the kinetics of photosynthesis alone. Our approach provides a quantitative framework for treating potentially adaptive functional variation across communities as a continuum and may thus inform studies of global change. More generally, our approach represents one of the first explicit combinations of ecological stoichiometry and metabolic scaling theories in the analysis of macroecological patterns.

LabBench Activity Dissolved Oxygen and Aquatic Primary Productivity

AB - Aim While physical constraints influence terrestrial primary productivity, the extent to which geographical variation in productivity is influenced by physiological adaptations and changes in vegetation structure is unclear. Further, quantifying the effect of variability in species traits on ecosystems remains a critical research challenge. Here, we take a macroecological approach and ask if variation in the stoichiometric traits (C: N: P ratios) of plants and primary productivity across global-scale temperature gradients is consistent with a scaling model that integrates recent insights from the theories of metabolic scaling and ecological stoichiometry. Location This study is global in scope, encompassing a wide variety of terrestrial plant communities. Methods We first develop a scaling model that incorporates potentially adaptive variation in leaf and whole-plant nutrient content, kinetic aspects of photosynthesis and plant respiration, and the allometry of biomass partitioning and allocation. We then examine extensive data sets concerning the stoichiometry and productivity of diverse plant communities in light of the model. Results Across diverse ecosystems, both foliar stoichiometry (N:P) and 'nitrogen productivity' (which depends on both community size structure and plant nutrient content) vary systematically across global scale temperature gradients. Primary productivity shows no relationship to temperature. Main conclusions The model predicts that the observed patterns of variation in plant stoichiometry and nutrient productivity may offset the temperature dependence of primary production expected from the kinetics of photosynthesis alone. Our approach provides a quantitative framework for treating potentially adaptive functional variation across communities as a continuum and may thus inform studies of global change. More generally, our approach represents one of the first explicit combinations of ecological stoichiometry and metabolic scaling theories in the analysis of macroecological patterns.

Describes the elements of niches, or aspects, of the biological and physical environment that determine where and when organisms live and in what numbers.

Glossary of Biological Terms ← BACK

Paoli, G. D., Curran, L. M., & Zak, D. R. (2005). Phosphorus efficiency of Bornean rain forest productivity: Evidence against the unimodal efficiency hypothesis. Ecology, 86(6), 1548-1561.

Nevertheless, what is somewhat philosophically troubling about the useof GIS in ecology is the conceptualization and representation ofgeographical information as: (a) a linked set of places, linked in thesense that the places must maintain fully precise adjacency relations;but (b) an unlinked set of attributes (for instance, the presence orabsence of species or other biological features). There is somethingdisarmingly natural about this: it certainly seems to capture thegeographical rootedness in place that lies at the basis of planningfor biodiversity conservation. But this choice of representation hasits costs: the mode of representation which is at the core of GISmakes it “natural” to represent systems in such a way thatcertain types of relationships tend to get lost, or at least relegatedto the background, while others receive emphasis. Consider thefollowing example. Carnivores cannot be present at any place unlessprey species also exist. This trivial and obvious ecological factcannot be explicitly represented using the standard resources of anyGIS package (that is, it cannot be represented without writing specialprograms). Attributes are represented without relations betweenthem. This encourages, though does not require, analyses that do notuse relations between attributes. (Obviously, one can start with aGIS-based representation and add other relations as part of thesuperstructure of the model.) Philosophers of science have long knownthat modes of representation influence the introduction anddevelopment of conceptual systems based on them. GIS may have such aninfluence through representational choices that guides ecology down apath where relations between attributes receive less emphasis thanthey would in traditional ecological models.

Order now
  • UNMATCHED QUALITY

    As soon as we have completed your work, it will be proofread and given a thorough scan for plagiarism.

  • STRICT PRIVACY

    Our clients' personal information is kept confidential, so rest assured that no one will find out about our cooperation.

  • COMPLETE ORIGINALITY

    We write everything from scratch. You'll be sure to receive a plagiarism-free paper every time you place an order.

  • ON-TIME DELIVERY

    We will complete your paper on time, giving you total peace of mind with every assignment you entrust us with.

  • FREE CORRECTIONS

    Want something changed in your paper? Request as many revisions as you want until you're completely satisfied with the outcome.

  • 24/7 SUPPORT

    We're always here to help you solve any possible issue. Feel free to give us a call or write a message in chat.

Order now
  • You submit your order instructions

  • We assign an appropriate expert

  • The expert takes care of your task

  • We send it to you upon completion

Order now
  • 37 684

    Delivered orders

  • 763

    Professional writers

  • 311

    Writers online

  • 4.8/5

    Average quality score

Order now
  • Kim

    "I have always been impressed by the quick turnaround and your thoroughness. Easily the most professional essay writing service on the web."

  • Paul

    "Your assistance and the first class service is much appreciated. My essay reads so well and without your help I'm sure I would have been marked down again on grammar and syntax."

  • Ellen

    "Thanks again for your excellent work with my assignments. No doubts you're true experts at what you do and very approachable."

  • Joyce

    "Very professional, cheap and friendly service. Thanks for writing two important essays for me, I wouldn't have written it myself because of the tight deadline."

  • Albert

    "Thanks for your cautious eye, attention to detail and overall superb service. Thanks to you, now I am confident that I can submit my term paper on time."

  • Mary

    "Thank you for the GREAT work you have done. Just wanted to tell that I'm very happy with my essay and will get back with more assignments soon."

Ready to tackle your homework?

Place an order