Call us toll-free

Quick academic help

Don't let the stress of school get you down! Have your essay written by a professional writer before the deadline arrives.

Calculate the price

Pages:

275 Words

$19,50

Elements of the Low Cost Prothesis

N2 - Background and aim: The prosthetic options for higher level amputees are limited and costly. Advancements in computer-aided design programs and three-dimensional printing offer the possibility of designing and manufacturing transitional prostheses at very low cost. The aim of this project was to describe an inexpensive three-dimensional printed mechanical shoulder prosthesis to assist a pre-selected subject in performing bi-manual activities. Technique: The main function of the body-powered, manually adjusted three-dimensional printed shoulder prosthesis is to provide a cost-effective, highly customized transitional device to individuals with congenital or acquired forequarter amputations. Discussion: After testing the prototype on a young research participant, a partial correction of the patient’s spinal deviation was noted due to the counterweight of the device. The patient’s family also reported improved balance and performance of some bimanual activities after 2 weeks of using the device. Limitations of the design include low grip strength and low durability. Clinical relevance: The prosthetic options for higher level amputees are limited and costly. The low-cost three-dimensional printed shoulder prosthesis described in this study can be used as a transitional device in preparation for a more sophisticated shoulder prosthesis.

Low Cost Prothesis at Fablab Amsterdam

Natural disasters are occurring everyday across the globe, these claim the lives and livelihood of many individuals and families, especially in poorer regions of the world where if there is access to necessary medical care it is difficult to afford. Because of this there are many who have suffered a lower limb amputation and thus have had their ability to provide for themselves and their families greatly reduced or taken away. Our projects goal was to meet this critical need by building on the work of previous senior design teams at the University of Arkansas, in the testing, analysis, and design of a low-cost prosthetic foot that would allow lower limb amputees who are unable to afford a high level prosthesis to regain a significant portion of their lost mobility. The final design of the prosthesis underwent static and fatigue testing as described in the ISO standard 10328 (Prosthetics-Structural testing of lower limb prostheses-Requirements and test methods). The project was then submitted to the universities institutional review board (IRB) for the approval of an actual human test. After receiving approval the test was successfully performed at Snell Prosthetic & Orthotic Laboratory with the assistance of a local prosthetist Randy Ludolph and a local volunteer who had a previously existing lower limb amputation. Although further testing still needs to be completed to ensure safe long-term use of the prosthesis the preliminary static and fatigue testing, and most importantly, the successful human trial show significant promise for our prosthesis to be successfully used to aid lower limb amputees in living more enjoyable and productive lives.

lowcostprosthesis | The first ever 50 dollar prosthesis

T1 - Design and assessment of a low-cost, electromyographically controlled, prosthetic hand

Once the pieces are bent into the proper shapes they are heat treated for 30 minutes at 1500 ± 50°F and water quenched. Then the pieces are tempered at 675°F degrees. This combination of heat treating and tempering increases the strength of the steel while still allowing it to bend and flex elastically. The foot is then assembled and put onto the pylon. The heat treatment options for shops in other countries have not been evaluated yet. We assume that the shops can at least use a crude furnace set up where they use the metal color to judge the metal temperature (When metal turns orange it is hot enough to be treated).

This project is needed to provide an option for the many lower limb amputees around the world who cannot afford the dynamic prostheses on the market, or who do not have access to such devices, that can be affordable and most importantly be manufactured in the country with local labor. The idea of a low cost dynamic-response foot is currently in development and being tested in Thailand, but this design does not seem to be a design that could be produced by in-country craftsman.

Low cost prosthesis - Waag Society

Could this kind of low cost prosthesis soon offer a solution in developing countries and beyond?

N2 - The study reported here explored the design and realization of a low-cost, elec-tromyographically controlled hand prosthesis for amputees living in developing countries. The developed prosthesis is composed of a light aluminum structure with opposing fingers connected to a DC motor that imparts only the movement of grasp. Problems associated with surface electromyographic signal acquisition and processing, motor control, and evaluation of grasp force were addressed, with the goal of minimizing cost and ensuring easy assembly. Simple analog front ends amplify and condition the electromyographic signals registered from two antagonist muscles by surface electrodes. Analog signals are sampled at 1 kHz and processed by a microcontroller that drives the motor with a supply voltage proportional to the muscular contraction, performing the opening and closing of the opposing fingers. Reliable measurements of the level of muscle contractions were obtained by specific digital processing: real-time operators implementing the root mean square value, mean absolute value, standard deviation, and mean absolute differential value were compared in terms of efficiency to estimate the EMG envelope, computational load, and time delay. The mean absolute value operator was adopted at a time window of 64 milliseconds. A suitable calibration procedure was proposed to overcome problems associated with the wide variation of electromyograph amplitude and background noise depending on the specific patient's muscles selected. A pulse-width modulated signal drives the DC motor, allowing closing and opening of the prosthesis. The relationship between the motor-driver signal and the actual hand-grasp force developed by the prosthesis was measured using a hand-held grip dynamometer. The resulting force was proportional to current for moderate values of current and then saturated. The motor torque, and, in turn, the force elicited, can be measured by sensing the current absorbed by the motor. Therefore, the grasp force can be opportunely limited or controlled. The cost of the only electronic and mechanical components of the electromyographically controlled hand was about US$50; other costs, such as the cost of labor to assemble the prosthesis and the production of adapters for patients, were not estimated.

The first phase spent four months for SF-36 health survey and prosthesis assessment questionnaire data collection on metal prosthesis, monolimb measurement, fitting and follow up.

KW - low-cost prosthesis
Order now
  • UNMATCHED QUALITY

    As soon as we have completed your work, it will be proofread and given a thorough scan for plagiarism.

  • STRICT PRIVACY

    Our clients' personal information is kept confidential, so rest assured that no one will find out about our cooperation.

  • COMPLETE ORIGINALITY

    We write everything from scratch. You'll be sure to receive a plagiarism-free paper every time you place an order.

  • ON-TIME DELIVERY

    We will complete your paper on time, giving you total peace of mind with every assignment you entrust us with.

  • FREE CORRECTIONS

    Want something changed in your paper? Request as many revisions as you want until you're completely satisfied with the outcome.

  • 24/7 SUPPORT

    We're always here to help you solve any possible issue. Feel free to give us a call or write a message in chat.

Order now

ATOR: Low cost human face prosthesis with the aid of …

AB - The study reported here explored the design and realization of a low-cost, elec-tromyographically controlled hand prosthesis for amputees living in developing countries. The developed prosthesis is composed of a light aluminum structure with opposing fingers connected to a DC motor that imparts only the movement of grasp. Problems associated with surface electromyographic signal acquisition and processing, motor control, and evaluation of grasp force were addressed, with the goal of minimizing cost and ensuring easy assembly. Simple analog front ends amplify and condition the electromyographic signals registered from two antagonist muscles by surface electrodes. Analog signals are sampled at 1 kHz and processed by a microcontroller that drives the motor with a supply voltage proportional to the muscular contraction, performing the opening and closing of the opposing fingers. Reliable measurements of the level of muscle contractions were obtained by specific digital processing: real-time operators implementing the root mean square value, mean absolute value, standard deviation, and mean absolute differential value were compared in terms of efficiency to estimate the EMG envelope, computational load, and time delay. The mean absolute value operator was adopted at a time window of 64 milliseconds. A suitable calibration procedure was proposed to overcome problems associated with the wide variation of electromyograph amplitude and background noise depending on the specific patient's muscles selected. A pulse-width modulated signal drives the DC motor, allowing closing and opening of the prosthesis. The relationship between the motor-driver signal and the actual hand-grasp force developed by the prosthesis was measured using a hand-held grip dynamometer. The resulting force was proportional to current for moderate values of current and then saturated. The motor torque, and, in turn, the force elicited, can be measured by sensing the current absorbed by the motor. Therefore, the grasp force can be opportunely limited or controlled. The cost of the only electronic and mechanical components of the electromyographically controlled hand was about US$50; other costs, such as the cost of labor to assemble the prosthesis and the production of adapters for patients, were not estimated.

Design and assessment of a low-cost, …

So it’s exciting to hear about new projects to develop low cost alternatives. We interviewed Oriol Bertomeu, who started developing a low cost hand prosthesis based on 3D printing while he was studying Engineering in Industrial Design.

Order now
  • You submit your order instructions

  • We assign an appropriate expert

  • The expert takes care of your task

  • We send it to you upon completion

Order now
  • 37 684

    Delivered orders

  • 763

    Professional writers

  • 311

    Writers online

  • 4.8/5

    Average quality score

Order now
  • Kim

    "I have always been impressed by the quick turnaround and your thoroughness. Easily the most professional essay writing service on the web."

  • Paul

    "Your assistance and the first class service is much appreciated. My essay reads so well and without your help I'm sure I would have been marked down again on grammar and syntax."

  • Ellen

    "Thanks again for your excellent work with my assignments. No doubts you're true experts at what you do and very approachable."

  • Joyce

    "Very professional, cheap and friendly service. Thanks for writing two important essays for me, I wouldn't have written it myself because of the tight deadline."

  • Albert

    "Thanks for your cautious eye, attention to detail and overall superb service. Thanks to you, now I am confident that I can submit my term paper on time."

  • Mary

    "Thank you for the GREAT work you have done. Just wanted to tell that I'm very happy with my essay and will get back with more assignments soon."

Ready to tackle your homework?

Place an order